10.36.05.06

.06 Psychological Assessment.

A. A psychologist or psychology associate shall:

(1) Perform evaluations and diagnostic services in a professional relationship when assessment data is indicated by the professional context;

(2) Administer psychological tests in keeping with accepted standards of practice and avoid use of obsolete measurement techniques;

(3) Use appropriate or specialized assessment instruments when working with individuals from special populations;

(4) Use appropriate scoring devices, norms, and standards in evaluating test protocols;

(5) Select scoring and interpretive programs and services on the basis of evidence of the validity of the programs and procedures;

(6) Report the results of assessment procedures by:

(a) Using adequate interpretative aids or explanations;

(b) Including any deficiencies of the assessment norms for the individual assessed, and any relevant reservations or qualifications which affect the validity, reliability, or other interpretation of results; and

(c) Avoiding misuse of automated interpretative reports;

(7) Base recommendations or decisions on test results that are reasonably current and not obsolete;

(8) Supply a manual or other printed material which fully describes the development of the assessment procedure or service, the rationale, evidence of validity and reliability, and characteristics of the normative population when offering an assessment procedure or automated interpretation service to other professionals; and

(9) Release test results only to patients and clients as appropriate.

B. A psychologist or psychology associate may not:

(1) Release test protocols or raw data to persons who are not qualified to interpret and use the information appropriately, except as required by law;

(2) Encourage or promote the use of psychological assessment techniques or computerized assessment and interpretation by unqualified persons; or

(3) Reproduce test materials or describe psychological tests or other assessment devices in popular publications, lectures, or public presentation in ways that might compromise their validity.